Reviewed

AIG Logo, Before and After

Established in 1919, AIG (American International Group) is an international insurance organization with commercial, institutional, and individual customers in more than 130 countries providing property-casualty insurance as well as life insurance and retirement services in the United States. AIG is best (worst?) known for its economic crisis in 2008 and being bailed out by the Federal Reserve Bank and the United States Treasury (i.e., some taxpayer money in there) to the tune of $90ish billion. With AIG gradually repaying its debt, it’s time to shed the logo that associated the firm with the financial crisis in preparation for a complete “rebrand of its property casualty and life and retirement segments later this fall.” No design credit given.

“Our new logo reflects a rebuilt and forward looking AIG — contemporary, dynamic, transparent, and revitalized. Every day, we are working to build on that accomplishment by continuing to innovate, while providing our clients with outstanding products and services.”
Press Release

Video animation explaining AIG’s IOU to America.

It’s hard to write a 500-word essay about this logo change. This is so simple and basic it hurts: AIG is going from old school, royal-blue rectangle, serif logo to a friendlier, brighter blue rectangle (in a stroke), sans serif logo. That’s it. The implications are obvious, if not exactly dramatic: appear less corporate, less scary, and signal — by going to the bare minimum opposite visual cues — that this is a new kind of company. Mazel tov. It works. For a company this size, under this kind of scrutiny, any move is a big move, so the restrained redesign probably makes most sense and unless there is some wildly creative application of the logo, this is probably as exciting and interesting as this redesign is going to get. To its credit, the execution is fairly competent through a nice typeface selection, a pretty hue of blue, and a stroke thickness that matches the “I” in the name — in terms of simplicity and bluntness, they got it right.

Thanks to James I. Bowie for the tip.

filed under Corporate and tagged with ,

Reviewed October 3, 201210.03.12 by Armin


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