Reviewed

Telstra Logo, Before and After

Established in 1993, Telstra is Australia’s largest telecommunications company, providing mobile, home phone, internet, and cable services, employing more than 39,000 people around the world. As some of our tipsters have noted, Telstra is the Australian equivalent of AT&T. Yesterday, Telstra unveiled a new identity designed by the Sydney office of Interbrand.

Telstra Logo, Before and After

The Telstra logo will continue in its current shape, and will feature a new colour palette incorporating orange, green, turquoise, blue, purple and magenta. The new look will be used for all customer groups including consumer, business, enterprise and government. It will be applied across thousands of applications from uniforms to service vehicles to packaging over the course of the coming months. Telstra has minimised the costs associated with rolling out the new brand identity by employing a gradual approach that aligns with scheduled cross-company programs of work.

DDB Group’s specialist brand agency, Interbrand, worked with Telstra on the brand identity and along with DDB Sydney launched a new Telstra advertising campaign featuring the new look brand through TV and press last night.
Press Release

Animated TV spot.

Brand video, showing a few more applications and the use of the pinwheel device.

Telstra

Telstra’s new fleet.

Telstra

Print ads. Image source.

Other than a rather loose tracking, there was nothing wrong with the old logo to the point where the new logo is the same as it was except that it has dropped all of those annoying letters that represent the name. I am assuming that this brand is so prevalent in Australia that it can afford such a move and its “T” icon has enough equity to stand on its own. Although it’s not completely alone: it is now surrounded by an animated semi-pinwheel of colors that adorns most customer touchpoints and supports the new tagline, “Welcome to life in full colour”. Based on the animated spot shown above and the over video, this identity feels fairly dynamic and engaging, through a pinch of flexibility that establishes strong consistency. The best part of this for Telstra is that they have taken the basis of their existing identity and built a new visual language around it, losing little and gaining plenty of potential.

Thanks to Clinton Duncan for first tip.

filed under Telecom and tagged with , , ,

Reviewed September 19, 201109.19.11 by Armin


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