Reviewed

The Dream Factory Logo, Before and After

Established in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1983 and originally known as The Rainbow Society, the newly renamed The Dream Factory is “a charitable organization dedicated to fulfilling the once-in-a-lifetime dreams of Manitoba children suffering from life threatening illnesses.” Focusing its efforts on children from Manitoba, The Dream Factory has helped over 530 children in the past 19 years — Make-A-Wish Foundation, the biggest organization in this category, has helped 212,000 kids since 1980, just as a point of reference. This past November, The Rainbow Society changed its name to The Dream Factory and introduced a new identity designed by Winnipeg-based Cocoon Branding.

The airship logo design was inspired by the organization’s new positioning line: “Sometimes kids deserve to get carried away.” The Dream Factory helps kids forget about their illness — even just for a moment — and encourages them to get carried away in the anticipation of having their dream come true, the experience itself, and the memories they will keep with them when they return to their routine of doctors, treatments, and hospital visits.
— Text provided by Cocoon

The Dream Factory

The Dream Factory

Logo in one and full color.

I mentioned the Make-A-Wish Foundation because when I first saw the new identity, before reading anything about the The Dream Factory, I assumed this was a large, national organization helping thousands of kids a year, much like Make-A-Wish. That’s a significant thing for an identity to do. I was surprised to see it was a small organization, which the old logo supported and didn’t do it any favors in making it look like a solid organization nor did it make any allusions whatsoever to what it did.

The new logo and identity aren’t perfect but they make an immediate statement that is relevant and uplifting. I really like the concept of the airship and building its balloon from the word Dream. There is a slight disconnect between that bold typography and the thin script used for “The” and “factory” and those sit a little too close to the blue stroke. The ship part of the logo is downright adorable, it just looks like a little-train-that-could, pulling at that big balloon. Even the way it’s positioned and rotated you can read into it that it’s like the children they help, optimistically pushing forward.

The rest of the identity is nice and playful, I even like the blue to cream gradient, but the typography in the business cards and even on the website lacks the sophistication and attention to detail that the logo has. A few less type-on-a-curve and a better typeface selection would improve this plenty. Overall, a great redesign and renaming.

The Dream Factory

The Dream Factory

The Dream Factory

Stationery and business card detail.

The Dream Factory

The Dream Factory

The Dream Factory

The Dream Factory

The pop-up corporate folder became a highlight piece to be given to dream children and prospective donors. This folder will often be the first connection that the brand will have, and needed to hold the essence of the organization as well as keep the aspect of the surreal feeling of a dream. A pop-up book was the perfect vehicle for this. The pop-up also holds the various collateral that the folder will need to carry.

The Dream Factory

The Dream Factory

Behind the scenes video.

filed under Non-Profit and tagged with , ,

Reviewed February 2, 201202.02.12 by Armin


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