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BY JonSel


The Real Thing. Really.

Coca-Cola Can, Before and After

….bzzz….snap….crackle…awheeeeeeyoooooo…distortion….static…fade in…. Excuse me while I break into your regularly scheduled programming of corporate identity changes to focus on another aspect of Brandâ„¢: packaging. I’ve worked in both the corporate identity and packaging fields for over 10 years now. If I could sum up my general feeling on mass-market packaging (in the United States), I’d say it sucks. At some point, there are only so many variations one can do on ribbons, splashes, swooshes, dimensional type and fake water droplets. When small percentage points of market share can mean hundreds of millions of dollars, you can kind of understand. Kind of. So it thrills me to no end when someone of stature refuses to do it anymore.

I present the New Old Coke.

Diet Coke and Coca-Cola Zero Cans

For years, since the early 90s really, the familiar red can of Coca-Cola has added more and more elements. From splashes and exploding bottles to buttons to polar bears to fizzies and water drops, the can has seen many permutations. To what end, though? Convincing people that this drink which they know so well is still the same drink? At the point which you have an iconic product that, as long as you don’t screw with the formula, everyone knows, how do you keep refreshing the brand? It’s a tough challenge, and Coke’s really pulled out a beauty here.

They’ve essentially done absolutely nothing. All the extra bits and doodads and extraneous graphics are gone. Classic coke imagery: the red, the ribbon, and the coke script. “Classic” is even in a simple lowercase sans serif. This is a confident design. Coca-cola is acknowledging that we all know the product, so just drink it. They’ve given similar treatment to the majority of the Coke line, including Diet and Zero. Simple, back to basics, pure equity. Compared with Pepsi’s blow-it-all-out how-many-designs-can-we-produce-in-a-summer strategy, this takes guts. You just don’t see that all too often from one of the largest brands in the world and I certainly appreciate it.

(If you want to see a large collection of cans, dating way back to the 50s, check this site out.)

I now return you to your regularly scheduled program, “That’s Not My Logo”. ….bzzz….snap….crackle…awheeeeeeyoooooo…distortion….static….fade out….

Entry Information

DATE: Jun.28.2007|CAT: Food| 138

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Comments Jump to Most Recent Comment

Don Whelan’s comment is:

Hooray! I was ecstatic when I saw the new can for the first time; thanks for giving it mention here. Coke got it right: This can is perfect.

On Jun.28.2007 at 10:48 PM

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Neven’s comment is:

That's a beautiful, Apple-like simplification and product differentiation. Perfect is the word.

On Jun.28.2007 at 11:12 PM

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Alex’s comment is:

This is awesome.

On Jun.28.2007 at 11:12 PM

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Mark’s comment is:

YES! I LOVE IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Growing up in the 90's this design brings back a great era of graphic design!

Yes this is excellent keep it simple, clean and drinkable.

I LOVE IT!

this is what Coca-Cola is all about, it's recognizable symbol, thats what make Coke!

Now Pepsi, how about you shed some extra graphic pounds?

On Jun.28.2007 at 11:39 PM

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richard’s comment is:

Just saw Moira Cullen at an AIGA Retreat and she was proudly showing off her cans. Wait, that did not sound right! Was discussing her cans. Again, not so right sounding.

Anyhow, as design director of Coke, she said you would not believe how hard it was to redesign the can and NOT have bubbles on the cans!

I agree, absolutely pure and beautiful.

On Jun.29.2007 at 12:07 AM

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R Berger’s comment is:

I favor Pepsi (well actually, Dr. Pepper/Mr.Pibb), but this new clean can would get me to pick up a six-pack or two.

On Jun.29.2007 at 12:31 AM

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Colin Williams’s comment is:

The other media looks great, too, following this "classic" approach. I'm lovin' it.

On Jun.29.2007 at 01:01 AM

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Mr. One-Hundred’s comment is:

Finally! Let’s hope this is the beginning of a return to well-executed simplicity.

A lecturer once told me that design isn’t about what you put on a page (or, yes, a can) but what you leave off. These cans supports that theory beautifully.

I wonder if their advertising will follow suit and quieten down the message a bit...

On Jun.29.2007 at 01:24 AM

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Von Glitschka’s comment is:

Giddy up!

Marketing people love gimmicks like bubbles, lens flares etc. So I'd love to hear the story on how 'Design' won out over marketings usual role of being a 'Serial Design Killer.'

On Jun.29.2007 at 01:25 AM

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Mr. One-Hundred’s comment is:

Finally! Let’s hope this is the beginning of a return to well-executed simplicity.

A lecturer once told me that design isn’t about what you put on a page (or, yes, a can) but what you leave off. These cans supports that theory beautifully.

I wonder if their advertising will follow suit and quieten down the message a bit...

On Jun.29.2007 at 01:27 AM

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Splashman’s comment is:

Ditto the kudos. This is Coke cashing in on their brand recognition. Very, very smart.

Contrast this with Jiffy Lube, which flushed whatever recognition they had down the toilet.

On Jun.29.2007 at 02:55 AM

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Martin Westin’s comment is:

I agree. Looks great. So why bother commenting...?

I just wanted to voice the hope that the branding of their websites, TV-spots and other marketitng will follow this newfound simplicity.

On Jun.29.2007 at 03:01 AM

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C-LO’s comment is:

Squeaky clean

On Jun.29.2007 at 08:23 AM

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Guillaume’s comment is:

What? Ugh.

This modernist obsession is getting creepy. This is not well executed simplicity. There's absolutely no elegance. Where is the white-space? Why is the logo so big? How will the back - with all its text and code-bars - integrate ?

This just looks like those Dharma packagings in Lost (sorry for the poor reference, let's try again). This feels like Orwell's '84. It says : "You drink coke - because it's coke and that's how it has to be". While it used to say : "You're having coke here. Refreshing, warm-harted, sparkling. You like it that way don't you?"

Man, I liked the mini yellow stripe.

They are going to loose market-share with this, and luckily we'll be back to the old soon.

How would apple look if it's logo spread it's fat ass all over the place like this, and didn't even have the subte gradients, the glow, the deliquate tints? Because none of this is here. This is not well executed simple design, this is non-design. Elements that are just put together, in a rather clumpsy, undeliberate way.

How it should have been : horizontal, way smaller logo. Smack in the middle. One type for all products. I mean, how can one justify that "ZeR0" thing, there? And the swoosh? How about getting rid of it? It has even less meaning than the water-droplets, and way way less functions than that old little touch of yellow.

All that unanimous praise is seriously disappointing me (not a very constructive thing to say - but I really feel so).

On Jun.29.2007 at 08:31 AM

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Corey Buckner’s comment is:

If only consumers would learn how to be monolithic this would all be so much easier... The reality is that there is no such thing as "good" design and "bad" design. There is effective, there is popular, elegant even; but certainly not "good" or "bad".

Obviously because we [designers] were all educated in similar educational programs, read the same magazines, and studied the same "Old Masters" we tend to have an idea about what "good" and "bad" designs are. But, those ideas are extremely biased.

I don't think this new/old can is any better or worse than it's predecessor. It is certainly clean, but it's the same old thing; no creativity; just a reaching back to an old design and calling it retro or classic as a means to explain why Coke should write a check for the design. Honestly, if I saw this can on the shelf next to it's predecessor I would assume they were years-old overstock and grab the more detailed can. Just a study of one there, nothing to it really.

Americans have always favored "simple" designs for one reason... THEY ARE CHEAPER TO PRINT. This goes for logos and packaging. But, to assume that the American public prefers simple is absurd because us pesky consumers REFUSE to just become monolithic drones who think and act the same way.

Here's a project I have had my students do that I have never had to do myself. Drive through four different neighborhoods:

1. A rich, white neighborhood
2. A working class, ethnically diverse neighborhood
3. A lower class, ethnically diverse neighborhood
4. An African-American ghetto (the projects).

Pay ONLY attention to the companies that ONLY service that demographic and see how much their ads vary. There is a HUGE difference in what "good" design is between a Celine Dion CD and a Little John or Master P CD.



Many would contend that the Lil John and Master P CDs are NOT Good Design (myself included), but the record label that sells the CDs would say that the design is PERFECT.

The new Coke can works for a certain demographic, but certainly not mine. Doesn't mean it is bad or good, just means that they missed my demo. Maybe I wasn't their target, and most often for companies this large Anglos around the globe are the main target and they will have sub-identities for the world's minorities. This is because, they recognize the limitations of a design, even a good one, when distributed on a global scale.

My opinion, for what it's worth, is this is an effective design; as effective as the first hundred times they used it. It is truly classic, and because of Coke's history, it will always be a good design to fall back on. But, it's really no better than it's predecessor. It is going to be cheaper to print, so it is a winner in that regard, but not as artistic.

Did Coke win with this design... It's a draw as far as I can see, and I doubt the can alone will do much to improve sales. The other re-rebranding elements are nice as I love "classic" designs, and maybe that was their focus more so than the packaging itself.

On Jun.29.2007 at 09:19 AM

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beth’s comment is:

I think it's especially important they did this with all the varieties and flavors Coke now comes in. As you said in contrast to "Pepsi's blow-it-all-out how-many-designs-can-we-produce-in-a-summer strategy" this makes it really easy to distinguish which product is what with the simplest possible visual cues. If I were to buy Pepsi right now I'd have to read the label just to be certain I was getting plain old regular Pepsi!

On Jun.29.2007 at 09:55 AM

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exigent’s comment is:

I agree with the last 2 posts... As I myself prefer Coke over the other colas, I was taken aback by the latest reincarnation of this classic. Ok. I get it, retro is back as it is every other decade. Though if I saw this design next to one of the more graphic cans, I would most definately pick up the more graphic. This is stricktly due to knowing that it was canned sometime this decade.

I like the simplicity of the design, but the design was poorly executed. The font is MUCH to large and overall quite boring to look at. To me it looks as though they got lazy and decided to look at an ancient can and carbon copy it.

The idea of a throwback is nice... clean lines on solid color can make quite the impact, but they missed the mark and my demographic as well.

I will look forward to the next rollout.

On Jun.29.2007 at 09:55 AM

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Tom’s comment is:

WOW! Where to begin? Having worked at The Coca-Cola Company, in the same department that Moria Cullen now runs, I can imagine getting this design approved was hell on earth.

Having been there in the 90's, I can tell you the reason a Coke package can end up with a million appendages is because the brand marketing MBA's spend millions of hours writing brand strategies that talk about effervescence and refreshment and believe that each package should communicate EVERYTHING!

I did notice in stores, that the 2L bottles have a few sparce bubbles splattered about. I can only guess this was a compromise with the higher ups.

I would say to the couple nay-sayers here that the beauty of this design is that it allows people young an old and from each sub-culture to endow their own feelings and meaning to this iconic brand. That is the value of good simple design. Advertising and marketing can build specific experiences and connections with the differnt target groups, while this icon stands strong and grows more valuable. From what I have heard, this trademark is so valuable, that if the company lost EVERYTHING - buildings, equipment, people, facilities, etc. EVERYTHING all over the world, but still retained ownership of this TM, they could get a loan off it's value to start over completely. Tell that to your next client who does not understand the value of design.

And now my only fear is that sales may shift because of some price of an ingredient in Argentina or whereever and this very appropriate design will be blamed. See the great work of Duffy Design from the 90's on Diet Coke, Minute Maid, Fruitopia, etc. Great design that was bastardized after only a few short years.

An identity this well produced does not happen with out a design thinking champion on the inside! I hope it last!

On Jun.29.2007 at 10:00 AM

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Jeff’s comment is:

All the comments on how the font on the new can is too large, while praising the previous design confuses me. To me, the font is the same size - they simply dropped the bevels, shading, and 3-D effects.

On Jun.29.2007 at 10:20 AM

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L.Vazquez’s comment is:

Would Ms. Dion's sales go up if her design were more 'effective?'

Is this CD design 'perfect?' I think this was one of their best selling albums.

On Jun.29.2007 at 10:20 AM

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Anon’s comment is:

I suspect the client isn't as confident as the designer about reverting to the simplified look.

Look closely at the promotional photos of the new cans (and not just in these examples you found): they all have water droplets on the cans to substitute for the ones that used to be painted on.

On Jun.29.2007 at 10:23 AM

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Corey Buckner’s comment is:

There was recently a light brand of Coke released in my area that came in a blue can; did anyone else see it, or know the name of it. I thought it was Coke Lite, but can't remember and no longer see it on the shelves. It was only in CVS and I thought it was a Pepsi product until I got a closer look. If anybody knows anything about this PLEASE share it with me. I am willing to bet it either flopped or Pepsi sued them but I can't find that info.

On Jun.29.2007 at 10:38 AM

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Corey Buckner’s comment is:

LOL about the Celine Dion CD!!! As for the Roots; they cater to a completely different Demo than Lil John (Rap vs Hiphop; Flamboyant culture vs a Conscious culture). BTW, I LOVE THE ROOTS and Hate Lil John hence my bias.

BTW
There was recently a light brand of Coke released in my area that came in a blue can; did anyone else see it, or know the name of it. I thought it was Coke Lite, but can't remember and no longer see it on the shelves. It was only in CVS and I thought it was a Pepsi product until I got a closer look. If anybody knows anything about this PLEASE share it with me. I am willing to bet it either flopped or Pepsi sued them but I can't find that info.

On Jun.29.2007 at 10:42 AM

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Jason L.’s comment is:

Agreed Jeff. The placement and size of the logo seems the same. Also, I don't feel like you can tout the way the barcodes and tables integrate into the old can at all.

Coke's brand as mentioned above is almost unrivaled. There was (is?) a billboard outside of Austin,TX that was simply a silhouetted Coke botttle on it's side. The caption read "Quick, name a soft drink..." What I like about the new can is it actually has more bravado than the old can. It says, this is Coke. You know it, you know you love it, so screw all the other stuff. To me that's something I can get behind.

As a disclaimer, I'm a snooty designer who happens to believe that Coke is the greatest chemical concoction mankind has ever invented.

On Jun.29.2007 at 10:42 AM

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Guillaume’s comment is:

Jeff : you don't seem to be getting my point. The older cans weren't good graphic design. They were overly commercial, but had the merit to effectively communicate something, that was actually quite correct.

Now these cans seem to try to make a statement - of simplicity, retro, whatever. And fail at it, both graphically and communicatively : they're inelegant and don't communicate a thing any more.

So yes, I rather have something that's ugly but dynamic, and that fits the feelings drinking coke could get me, rather than something ugly, and ugly, and also just plain ugly.

On Jun.29.2007 at 10:47 AM

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Guillaume’s comment is:

I thought you guys knew what a beautiful can looks like.

On Jun.29.2007 at 11:04 AM

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Corey Buckner’s comment is:

How's this for confusing the market??? They have another version that is blue where all the white & gray are.

On Jun.29.2007 at 11:12 AM

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elena’s comment is:

beautiful.

On Jun.29.2007 at 11:19 AM

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Corey Buckner’s comment is:

I really think Coke is running out of ideas because the ability to distinguish between one brand from another is becoming exceedingly difficult.

On Jun.29.2007 at 11:20 AM

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JonSel’s comment is:

My personal feeling on the Diet Coke brand is that Coca-Cola really doesn't quite know what to do with it. For years, it has been a stand-alone product, i.e. the design was independent of the red classic can. In the last redesign (with all the fizzies and bubbles), they brought it back to being a sub-brand of classic coke. I make the assumption that this was because the connotation of "diet" in the marketplace was changing dramatically (witness all the "zero" beverages) and they couldn't support a unique positioning for it any longer. It surprised me when it first came out, and I'm still a little surprised that they continued this with the latest design.

On Jun.29.2007 at 11:38 AM

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Corey Buckner’s comment is:

My first thought when I first saw it (the blue can, not the gray & blue one) I thought it was a Pepsi product. Then when I finally realized it was a Coke product I thought it was a concession that their competitor's color was better. A BLUE COKE BOTTLE!!! Hell has truly frozen over.

On Jun.29.2007 at 11:53 AM

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Doug’s comment is:

Wow. I love the 'back to basics' approach for Coke. The red can and white script speak everything the world has come to know or needs to know about the brand.

Coke's packaging has become so extraneous over the past several years, this was bound to be the next direction. They've not completely abandoned the frills, though - go look at packaging and ads for Sprite, Vault, and some of their other non-Coke brands. They're exhausting.

On Jun.29.2007 at 11:58 AM

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Tom’s comment is:

Jon - That has been a struggle for Coke for 20+ years. The more line extensions they add, the more they seem confused to have brands like diet and cherry Coke be their own brand or flavor extensions. It flips back and forth with almost every new CMO.

Plus, you are right, with the changing beverage world of waters and teas, etc. the diet soft drink category has suffered.

On Jun.29.2007 at 11:58 AM

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jillian’s comment is:

simple and beautiful, i love it.

On Jun.29.2007 at 12:05 PM

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JonSel’s comment is:

Tom – Coke's introduction of Coke Zero typifies that confusion. The original design was very silver, similar to Diet Coke. My initial reaction when I saw it in stores was that they were following the Sprite strategy, which renamed Diet Sprite as Sprite Zero (and lost the Diet language completely). It seemed a bold move for what had been, essentially, a stand-alone product in the Coke line. The longer Diet Coke and its various iterations stayed on the market, the more confusing it became. Converting Coke Zero to a primarily black can was a smart move (along with elimination of C2...). I'm still not completely sure of the difference between Diet Coke and Coke Zero (preferring to just go with the hard stuff when I have it), but at least I can separate them visually.

On Jun.29.2007 at 12:56 PM

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dw’s comment is:

I wonder how much age plays into how people are reacting to this. There's a certain level of nostalgia for me; it evokes the design of Coke cans before the New Coke debacle, back when I was a child and the Cola Wars had yet to start. The difference seems to be that "Classic" replaced "Enjoy" on the label.

It's minimalism and nostalgia all in one. Maybe Coke is conceding the African-American audience to Pepsi with this, or maybe not screaming above the energy drink cans with aggressive colors and logos is going to hurt their market share with teenagers. I don't know. But for those of us over the age of 30, it's a reminder of how simple things were when we were children.

On Jun.29.2007 at 01:06 PM

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JonSel’s comment is:

I don't think sheer nostalgia is what will sell this. It's certainly not a long-term strategy. In this instance, the can is simply an icon and should look contemporary but not overdone, and they've achieved that. The advertising and primary marketing channels (I see the can as secondary here) will drive the messaging. It's also possible that Coke has realized how hard it is to be all things to all people.

On Jun.29.2007 at 01:52 PM

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R Berger’s comment is:

"Many would contend that the Lil John and Master P CDs are NOT Good Design"

…and I'm sure those same people would agree that the Celine Dion CD isn't good design either.

On Jun.29.2007 at 02:07 PM

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Mark’s comment is:

I'm only 20 and this design reminds of good times when soda cans were drinkable.

I love how the white text and curved line seems to cutting into the red so cool.

The starkness was lost in the horrible additions in the past can.

On Jun.29.2007 at 02:13 PM

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Greg Scraper’s comment is:

The striking thing about the new can to me isn't the lack of graphics, it's that red; it blazes. I can't see muddying that up with a bunch of effects. I've long thought that it's about time that a soft drink company stop reminding people about the stomach lining-damaging carbonation they're about to consume. Nice.

On Jun.29.2007 at 02:24 PM

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Mark’s comment is:

BTW this this can isn't based on nostalgia if it was they would use the old mark from like the 70s if you notice that the the curved line was a bit more different back then.

So in essence they are using the current mark NOT the old one.

On Jun.29.2007 at 02:29 PM

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Mark’s comment is:

Although not coke but is cola can realated

The Pepsi design I miss the most.

It was so clean and simple.

On Jun.29.2007 at 02:39 PM

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stock_illustration’s comment is:

I really like it, and seeing that vintage red can cinches it. This is a great tie-in to the really nice tv ads I've seen featuring the posterized red bottle and bubbles...very cool.

On Jun.29.2007 at 02:56 PM

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humanot’s comment is:

kudos to coke ... another example of a smart corporation embracing design rather than abusing it or seeing it as an afterthought.

just noticed this prototype, and would much rather see this on the shelves instead of pepsi's current designgasms

On Jun.29.2007 at 03:31 PM

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R Berger’s comment is:

That's an interesting Pepsi Bottle-Can/Can-Bottle.
Botan?
Cattle?

On Jun.29.2007 at 03:49 PM

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Mark’s comment is:

Ooh I love the Pepsi-Cola prototype!

Why did it get rejected?

I think they got rid of that logo to look different from Coca-Cola.

Love it anyway.

On Jun.29.2007 at 04:08 PM

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Les Ismore’s comment is:

Less is more.

It always starts out with an innocent outline -y'know, to give it a little PUNCH.
And then a drop shadow -to, y'know, make it POP.
And then a gradient –y'know to make it SHINEY...
Then come the add-onns: bubbles, halftone patterns, sparkles, textures! more colors! Colored halftone shadows. Ooh! what's that filter called?!

Pretty soon, you wake up one day -just as Michael Jackson does everyday– and look in the mirror and say in horror, "What have I done?!!!" "I was beautiful just the way I was created!"

Thankfully, in design, you can undo.

There's a proper application for all of those effects and filters but the point is:

K.I.S.S. wins every time.

Design is about communication. The more voices talking at the same time, the harder it becomes to hear/understand the message.

Stick to the basics: Line. Shape. Color.

Less is MORE.

I've never drunk a Coke or Pepsi in my life but I'll definately buy that can and place it next to my classic 8 oz. green-glass Coke bottle. I have a feeling it won't last for long.

What flavor is Coke anyway? It smells like some carpet cleaning chemical.

By the way, that retro Pepsi can ROX! I want one.

On Jun.29.2007 at 05:09 PM

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Bill Tyrrell’s comment is:

The new "old" design is a step in the right direction.

However, is the word "classic" even necessary? It was introduced when the classic formula was brought back to differentiate it from "New Coke".

Since New Coke is no longer produced, the word "classic" on its product serves only as a reminder of its marketing blunder.

On Jun.29.2007 at 08:02 PM

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Tom’s comment is:

I bet "classic" is still on there because of the lawyers!

On Jun.29.2007 at 08:29 PM

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Corey Buckner’s comment is:

I just remembered that I have a cool Coke bottle from my visit to Croatia that I will try to take a dig pic of and post later.

On Jun.29.2007 at 08:40 PM

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L.Vazquez’s comment is:

Corey: I actually had some fun doing that Celine Dion CD cover. Too bad she wasn't wearing more rings. Plus, I almost renamed the title "Fall'n inta Ya" but, that would've been too much.

I see what you're saying about The Roots. I guess a people who favor the flamboyant culture expect the type of design that is on the Lil' John cover.

(The only hip hop I own is that Roots CD, early Wu-Tang, and some nice NY old school. Can't stand today's stuff.)

On Jun.29.2007 at 10:53 PM

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Jeff’s comment is:

Regarding the Coke Classic can, personally, I think it's a home run! It's elegant, it's sleek, and sophisticated and yet so simple in it's execution. Far better than the dreck we've seen the past 10 years or so. Of course I'm a big fan of the simpler, retro stylings. I'd kill to see the 16 oz. glass bottles come back. ;)

Remember this site in the supermarkets?

On Jun.30.2007 at 12:20 AM

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Jeff’s comment is:

Uhhhh...sight not site. Sheesh!

On Jun.30.2007 at 12:21 AM

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Juicy’s comment is:

I really like it. Hope to see more puristic designs in the future.

On Jun.30.2007 at 04:20 AM

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Mark’s comment is:

I completely remember that sight in supermarkets especially that old Sprite "Lymon" logo.

I miss simpler design, like this.

BTW anyone see the new Brisk can? It seems they've completely changed their look!

On Jun.30.2007 at 05:04 PM

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Mark’s comment is:

One more thing, if I'm not mistaken wasn't the original colors for Diet Coke brown and red?

What made them change those colors???

On Jun.30.2007 at 05:06 PM

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Audrée Lapierre’s comment is:

this is very nice. Very elegant. Of course some could argue that it will not please the consumer, but it is the job of the designers and company to TEACH the consumer about what's good and what's not.

On Jun.30.2007 at 08:29 PM

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Audrée Lapierre’s comment is:

BTW i would much prefer seeing real droplets on a can, than fake ones... fake is no good, fake will never make me think "yes thats fresh" I dont need to see sparkles and bubbles, I already know its coke form the logo on it. I love the logo and the red color. Both make remind me of the drink and I dont need a polar bear or some crappy psd effects. Less is more.

On Jun.30.2007 at 08:45 PM

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XMO’s comment is:

About time.

On Jul.01.2007 at 12:41 AM

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Shari’s comment is:

Agreed - the new old is a welcome return. Nice!

(But they could get a middle schooler to add inner and outer beveling and maybe some chrome effects and I'd still buy it, *if* they would just let us poor folks in the USA have real Coke with sugar in it again.)

On Jul.01.2007 at 04:16 AM

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rickyaustin’s comment is:

It took real smarts to fight off the more-is-more design attitude of many similar products.

Well done Coke.

On Jul.01.2007 at 06:40 AM

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Frank’s comment is:

I like the new/old simplicity but having seen the Coke can from the seventies that Mark posted i think that one rocks even more - it comes across Mac/Apple-ish as can be.

And yeah i would not want to be Michael Jackson for any money in the world.

On Jul.01.2007 at 08:27 PM

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Mr. One-Hundred’s comment is:

I wish they would go back to the old “Coke” wordmark rendered in Century Book. I felt it all started going bad when they changed it to the faux-futuristic, eras-like type with the grey band shadowing the Dynamic Ribbon Device. I think that’s when they added the diagonal hairlines in the back too.

On Jul.01.2007 at 09:53 PM

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Mr. One-Hundred’s comment is:

By the way, this is what our newest cans look like in Australia. I grabbed a couple of each and stowed them away safely.

http://www.smh.com.au/news/business/cokes-designer-can-proves-less--is-more/2006/09/09/1157222379790.html

On Jul.01.2007 at 10:09 PM

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disgruntled designer’s comment is:

they actually announced this product redesign back in february. here is the brand-speak which of course makes absolutely no sense but cost 100 kazillion dollars.

Coca-Cola Japan Co has redesigned its cans and bottles as part of its "The Coke Side of Life" marketing campaign. The beverage maker said Monday that the new look can will hit the Japanese market on Jan 29 before its introduction to the world market in March. "We live in a world where we make choices every day and 'The Coke Side of Life' encourages people to make those choices positive ones," said Marc Mathieu, senior vice president for carbonated soft drink core brands, marketing, srategy and innovation. "This new campaign invites people to create their own positive reality, to be spontaneous, listen to their hearts and live in full color."

On Jul.02.2007 at 01:22 PM

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Guillaume’s comment is:

Mr. One-Hundred’s : Those Australian cans really show how it should be. Exactly what I meant above.

On Jul.02.2007 at 02:59 PM

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David’s comment is:

I want the yellow stripe back.

On Jul.02.2007 at 03:25 PM

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Daren Guillory’s comment is:

lovely.

On Jul.02.2007 at 04:14 PM

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Mark’s comment is:

What was the funtion of that yellow stripe?

I mean it wasn't original,it added only another color, and just made the logo more complicated.

So how was adding the yellow stripe any better???

On Jul.02.2007 at 07:23 PM

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rynot’s comment is:

as it was in the beginning, is now, and every shall be.


amen.

On Jul.02.2007 at 08:05 PM

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laura’s comment is:

I disagree that the Australian cans are "how it should be". Using the existing product logos with the super clean, flat, modern graphics on the can seems like visual disconnect to me. Those marks are big and bold and I believe that weight and energy causes them to look floaty in all that space not at home in it.

On Jul.03.2007 at 01:56 PM

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Mark’s comment is:

I agree with Laura those Austrailan Coke cans look too empty, they're missing something. Why take away what makes Coke, Coke?

Plus those cans remind me of those cheap high caffeine energy drinks, not good.

It ain't Coke without the curved stripe.

On Jul.03.2007 at 02:31 PM

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Corey Buckner’s comment is:

I think the Aussie cans ROCK! But this conversation underlies something that we all know is true. THERE IS NO SINGULAR METHOD FOR DESIGN.

The conversation appears to be going this way:

"I love it, it's clean and simple."

"I hate it, it's boring."

"You're an idiot, this is an elegant design."

"No, you're an arrogant design junkie, the people want something different."

"WHAT! The people don't know what they want. It is the job of the designer to tell people what they want because they don't know."

"What, we are supposed to GIVE the people what they want."

"What?"

"What?"

This plays out over and over again and in the end Coke is still going to make Billions. If the Aussies like the cans (and this guy too) then that is probably why they were launched there and not here.

I think it is time for ALL of us to admit that we are not the center of the design universe, and while it is fine to say that we don't like or appreciate something; it is not our place to try to hold every logo that is released to our individual standards.

The BLATANT exception to all of this mumbo jumbo I said is the 2012 Olympics logo. I think we can all agree that someone took a steaming pile of feces, threw it against the wall, and with their finger scribbled "London 2012" in it.

On Jul.03.2007 at 03:55 PM

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Andrew’s comment is:

The yellow stripe is very uncessary.
It just reminds us of yellow liquids. . .

On Jul.03.2007 at 03:56 PM

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Pedro’s comment is:

1. get rid of the nice water droplets on the new photo of coke
2. shoot the before can as nice as the "new" one
3. relabel the before and after to be the opposites, or dont label it all

you'll get a different response I'm sure.
Its great to see Coke doing somthing like this, but I believe there's value in the "before" can as well. Packaging design is always evolving to meet consumer/marketing needs, Package designs change every 6months to 3years depending on the campaign while corporate identities should last at least 8years or more. (minus that awful new att logo, someone needs to redo that one soon).

The designer in me loves the simple, uncluttered can but its a whole new ball game when looking into that 2-way mirror. Which one says "refreshing" which one says "fun" which one says coke is a beverage, which one says its a corporation. Which one is 2007 vs 1990?

Looking forward to what it would look like next year.

On Jul.03.2007 at 07:56 PM

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Miranda’s comment is:

I don't even like Coke, but this design is beautiful in it's simplicity. It takes away some of the "BUY ME - DRINK ME!" all caps, all exclamations, whoring itself kind of look, and I like that.

An iconic brand should be able to retain it's integrity for longer than a summer. I believe I read a while back that Coke had reached it's pinnacle of world-wide saturation and public awareness - anyone who could possibly drink Coke knows about it by now.

I'm still not going to drink it (nothing short of the promise of riches could get me to buy Coke) but I really like the look.

On Jul.04.2007 at 05:02 PM

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Down10’s comment is:

I love this. "Back to basics" is a movement long overdue.

On Jul.05.2007 at 02:53 PM

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David E.’s comment is:

What I want to know is whether this is part of a whole new, well thought out branding strategy, or if they're going to go back to all the crap after 6 months. I hope it stays the way it is. :)

Now all they need is to lose the word "classic." We all know that Coke is classic.

On Jul.06.2007 at 07:58 PM

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Mark’s comment is:

Got an old can (the previous can) and a new can yesterday at a local restaurant, an both brought them home.

The new can looks stunning in person.

I was with my family at the time.

On Jul.08.2007 at 02:26 PM

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Guillaume’s comment is:

The yellow stripe brings warmth, and tones the whole thing down a bit.

I couldn't remember who or when, but I once saw an interview of the guy behind the yellow stroke (it got him famous). If I remember well, it was added after the new Coke fiasco. Surprisingly, the guy seemed to say the yellow stripe is a huge part of what brought coke back to live subversively. Sales went back up immediately.

That simple intervention has the ability to de-dramatize the can, to give it a more human and accessible feeling. In that perspective, it has as much use and reason to exist as the wave (which expresses dynamism, flow...). Its absence shows either one of two things : the point is either to cut down on the price of the printing, or to be nostalgic (which any trends-agency will tell you is not a right move at all for 2008-09, for what it's worth). But if the point was to act "less-is-more", it clearly failed in my perspective. There's either too much uselessness for it to be elegant or too few elements for it be communicative.

Regarding the Aussie can : the circle-bottle-graphic and the slimness of the can indeed give it an energy-drink look, and are likely unneeded. I was more referring to the lack of wave, the smallness and position of the logo and the almost equal treatment of the names.

But Corey is right, Coke remains Coke and its millions, its need to please all worldwide and I'm not ever expecting anything brilliant to come from them anyway. Which is presumably why this post has irritated me. Sorry, but it really takes to be an American to be fooled by Coca-Cola's trying to be "the real thing" in packaging (as Pedro shows with more diplomacy in his comment above).

On Jul.09.2007 at 08:21 AM

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Daniel V’s comment is:

I think the point here is that we can't move forward with understanding the latest Coke design while we, as designers, do not learn how to discuss a design.

I believe there were only three of four comments worth reading. The rest were just a repetition of the other: the design is good, they loved it, and Coke is my favorite soda. Who cares! What difference does it make?

We must expand our vocabulary and move beyond "good," "love it," etc.

Just because one happens to like one design it doesn't mean it is the best. I wonder if all those who have said that the new Coke design is "great" (whatever that is supposed to mean) just say so because if given the opportunity they wouldn't have done better than what that latest design did.

If one thinks that one design is good... explain why! Your own nostalgia ain’t helping to understand why “new/old” designs work.

On Jul.09.2007 at 01:31 PM

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Anonymous’s comment is:

geez, grumpy mcgrumpyton...how about offering the criticism you seek instead of wagging your smelly finger of disdain.

On Jul.09.2007 at 02:34 PM

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Ryan Howell’s comment is:

Oh no! Where will they put Santa?!

On Jul.09.2007 at 03:48 PM

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mattS’s comment is:

they're inelegant and don't communicate a thing any more.

What the heck does that even mean? At this point, Coke doesn't need to "communicate" anything beyond the fact that it's a can of Coke. If the "after" can communicates anything, it says "Coke". The "before" can says "Coke!!LOL!!111". I just want a goddamn soda.

On Jul.09.2007 at 11:46 PM

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filchyboy’s comment is:

I would posit that the new design is superior to the old as it gives more surface area to show off the bubbles and condensation which arise on the can as it is exposed to room temp. I suspect, although I don't have the data to back this up, that a potential drinker is likely to have a more positive appreciation for a can which supports that natural process and shows the user that the temperature of the Coke is perfect rather than a fake set of bubbles or condensation or a design which is so busy it does not lend itself to showing off this aspect of the soda drinking experience. In that respect the best design might very well include as much color field as possible to give the condensation bubbles ample room to show off.

Or I might be biased as I immediately recognized the design closer to the pre-New Coke debacle and was encouraged and gratified by this return to form. But I would like to think that the designers are smart enough to know how important the condensation is to the visceral experience of drinking soda.

On Jul.10.2007 at 02:36 AM

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Todd’s comment is:

I like the previous logo better, This newer logo looks too plain and the dynamic ribbon looks like a line of cocaine. The ORIGINAL design they are trying to resemble the dynamic ribbon looked better. Are they ever going to remove the word "classic" there is no need for it anymore!

On Jul.10.2007 at 01:01 PM

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fatknuckle’s comment is:

ditch the wordmark, ditch the "classic" keep the wave. Done.

On Jul.10.2007 at 01:10 PM

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SunnyCali’s comment is:

As a graphic design student, I am definitely not as experienced in the field as perhaps a few who have commented here, but what I can say is: when designing, make a DECISIVE choice for every element in a design, otherwise it looks like a mistake...Don't just "almost" line something up, either line it up or change it's position completely.

On the one hand, it was decisive for Coke to go from all the afore-mentioned elements to the few that are there now. That was a good choice, in my opinion, considering the clutter driven design we see every day. On the OTHER hand, with the exception that the swoop looks a little different and that the classic is all small caps (which is very smart, and whether or not that should even be there, I'll let someone else have the opinion)—with those exceptions, the can does basically look like the old one. This just seems redundant, and they could've designed something decisively DIFFERENT if what they were going for is DIFFERENT. Someone compared this Coke change to Apple changing it's identity/packaging and going for simple, no clutter, but that can't be compared to this, because with the script type "Coca-Cola" and same old design in general, it really seems like it's meant to be nastalgic, not necessarily simple and modern, as it's been suggested. The Coke zero definitely is an improvement of design, and is decisively different-not many soda designs have black dominating, and it was a smart move, but there again, if they were going for nastalgia, then why not do that across the board with all the Coke product designs? Inconsistent and confusing.

The Australian cans, while I agree that they look more like energy drinks, I believe they are going in the right direction where simplicity is concerned. (which, in a way, who cares if it looks like an energy drink cuz everybody knows its Coke and they could always go back to the old way if it lost money in sales from the lack of "recognition" on the shelf, which probably wouldn't happen) I would've been thrilled if the Australian version is the new can I saw in stores here, even if it does look have it's design flaws.

All that said, as a consumer who probably drinks, shamefully, 3 or 4 Cokes a DAY, I was confused by the new Coke design. I kept thinking, as someone mentioned earlier, that they were old cans, until I realized I was seeing the cans with that design in more than one location. I am BORED TO TEARS of that design!

On Jul.10.2007 at 04:19 PM

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Blake’s comment is:

Love it. Thank you Coke. Let's not call this bringing back the old. Let's call it bringing back simplicity. Hooray!

On Jul.11.2007 at 08:35 AM

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GBS’s comment is:

If the new can has the metallic look, fine. But the new bottles with the flat red label color is BORING!

On Jul.11.2007 at 10:53 AM

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Guillaume’s comment is:

> they're inelegant and don't communicate a thing any more.

>> What the heck does that even mean? At this point, Coke doesn't need to "communicate" anything beyond the fact that it's a can of Coke. If the "after" can communicates anything, it says "Coke". The "before" can says "Coke!!LOL!!111". I just want a goddamn soda.

Perhaps there is a cultural difference at play here. I must be having a coke about every two weeks. And when I do, I don't "just want a goddamn soda". I'm having a coke. Like when I drink a glass of whine. When drinking a good and refined whine, I like to see it being poured from a refined bottle. When I'm having a "fresh break", I quite like the can to allow me to groan "oh yeah".

I guess to you Coke is like toilet paper. You consume it unawarely. In that case, I understand. I would so very much like toilet-paper-packagings not to be as "communicative". If they head ears, I definitely would at least once have shouted back at them in the store, presumably not in a very mannered way.

On Jul.11.2007 at 03:01 PM

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JonSel’s comment is:

Perhaps there is a cultural difference at play here.

Guillaume, I think you have a good point here. American mass-market packaging tends to follow the "more-is-more" philosophy. It's almost a policy of overstating one's case. Granted, I saw my share of that in Europe as well, but there seems to be more willingness over there to give a product personality without overdoing it.

Seen in that light, the restrained, back-to-basics approach of Coke is a welcome sight in this market, at least to me. I don't find it lacking communication. It radiates confidence in the Coke brand. The larger personality aspects of the brand are communicated through other marketing channels, of which packaging is just one. By recognizing that the majority of American consumers know this product so well, emphasizing refreshment and water condensation and fizziness via the can graphics is simply unnecessary.

On Jul.11.2007 at 03:19 PM

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Ben’s comment is:

As much as i love simplistic design, i do find it hard to get excited about a can of coke. Funny how companies spend years and years working on their packaging and branding and revert to more or less what they had to begin with. At the end of the day coca colas will sell by the bucketload regardless of what can it comes in. I do like the diet look as diet in the uk has always had some extra things on the can, as has zero. But yeah it's a nice clean look, i just cant get too excited about it

On Jul.20.2007 at 07:47 AM

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Ken Fitzpatrick’s comment is:

Hi everyone while doing some gardening around my new caravan in scotland i dug down and found a complete big glass coca cola bottle with screw cap still on in excellent condition no cracks chips or anything , is there anyway i can find out what year it was made or from ?

On Jul.24.2007 at 06:40 PM

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Keller’s comment is:

I figured that everybody might be interested in that (at least in Canada) Coca-Cola does indeed eliminate the word classic off the can.

On Jul.24.2007 at 11:49 PM

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Andrew’s comment is:

I love this. I just love it. It makes me proud to drink Coke again. I would love it if many, many other products would follow suit. Simplicity, clean lines, gorgeous.

On Jul.30.2007 at 03:08 PM

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Alex’s comment is:

Beautiful, now if Pepsi would just follow their lead.

On Aug.03.2007 at 03:02 AM

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Anonymous’s comment is:

I LOVE the new coca cola design! I started drink soda again after two years! Now if they will go back to having awesome musical jingles like "Coke is it" from the 80's that would be awesome!

~Chris :-)

On Aug.19.2007 at 12:36 AM

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Anonymous’s comment is:

i work for coke. and i agree this design will appel to the new younger and current market. well dont to all the coke designers

On Aug.24.2007 at 02:08 PM

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Anonymous’s comment is:

it is sooooooooooooooooooooooooooo cool

On Sep.04.2007 at 08:04 PM

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Anonymous’s comment is:

In Canada, Classic isn't even on their labels anymore. Pathetic.

On Sep.05.2007 at 04:33 PM

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exigent’s comment is:

Oh how wonderful the "new-old" can looks, but look what was released along with it in their new campaign... And ugliness rears it's ugly head.

BARF BARF... oh but kuddos to the Coke team for their design sense... um no.

On Sep.11.2007 at 12:04 PM

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GBS’s comment is:

Interesting that the initial comments commend Coke for getting rid of the fake water droplets, bu the pictures of the new designs have actual water droplets. Kinda changes the look a bit, doesn't it, skewing the perception of the new, "clean" look?

On Sep.14.2007 at 10:42 AM

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DrTheopolis’s comment is:

I really like the clean lines and simplicity of the new/redesign, like so many others wrote before me. BUT... (forgive me if this was already mentioned, there were too many comments to read in depth) I also really like the type drop shadow on the "before" Coke can. It helps to elevate the type from the surface and therefore stand out, giving a flat surface some dimension. Drops done well do that.

So, what could they do to the "new" Coke can to give it some umph? I dunno. How about blind-emboss the Coca-Cola type/logo mark??? That would be a whole new level of nifty!

On Oct.02.2007 at 06:36 PM

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Michael from Sarstedt’s comment is:

Hi! ;-)
I saw the new "Re-Design" ( I like it ) last weekend at my shopping-tour in the Netherlands! Here in germany we have still the "new look".. but I hope we´ll get this Retro-Look here, too!!

On Oct.09.2007 at 07:55 AM

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elliot’s comment is:

if everyone drank cola the world would be a better place
x

On Oct.17.2007 at 07:19 AM

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Brendan’s comment is:

I'd really like to see the Coca-Cola company bring back the so-called harlequin design that appeared on cans in the mid to late 1960s:

On Nov.03.2007 at 07:46 PM

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Kellie’s comment is:

I love the return to the original. There's no need for fizzies, or sparkles or gradients. It actually dates the can quite a bit...if you look at it next to the new, clean version.

While we're on a soda topic...I say...get rid of plastic bottles and bring back those beautiful, recyclable glass bottles. There's nothing like drinking a Coke in a real green glass bottle.

On Nov.04.2007 at 12:06 AM

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Brendan’s comment is:

On second thought, I'd like to see the word "Coke" changed to the font that you see on the new Diet Coke cans. Thus the updated harlequin Coke can would look like the can in this Taiwanese advertisement:


On Nov.04.2007 at 02:39 PM

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Brendan’s comment is:

On Nov.09.2007 at 10:09 PM

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elcraigo’s comment is:

so borning. they have stripped all of the coke design down. just to save money

On Dec.12.2007 at 10:48 AM

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madeha’s comment is:

coca cola is a christian company it is not good it has cafine(drug) and it is teasing islam.

if u turn it in arabic it says la mecca la muhammud

wich means no mecca no muhammud


u r such rude pepol and thats true

On Dec.20.2007 at 05:05 PM

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Mark ’s comment is:

and your proof is???

do you think coke was against Islam since it's logo was made in 1886???

Where's your proof?

This has already been resolved.

http://www.thecoca-colacompany.com/contactus/myths_rumors/middle_east_subliminal.html

okay back on topic now.

On Dec.21.2007 at 11:07 AM

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boogie’s comment is:

hey i didn't like it i think it was boogieish. hahahahahahahahaaaa!!!!!!!!!

On Feb.03.2008 at 04:10 AM

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Anonymous’s comment is:

good soda from:Hamza

On Feb.09.2008 at 06:59 PM

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Anonymous’s comment is:

so fantastic.lol

On Feb.19.2008 at 01:32 PM

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Anonymous’s comment is:

so fantastic.lol

On Feb.19.2008 at 01:32 PM

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Original Sin’s comment is:

They made a mistake with the new cans. They used the version of the logo that had been slimmed down to be used with strokes (edges) of a different colour. Not it just looks impoverished. Have a look at where the top of the "C" from Cola goes through the L, and compare it to the picture of the old 80s can.

On Feb.20.2008 at 08:06 AM

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Alex’s comment is:

Only thing cooler than the coke 'de-design' would be a Pepsi 'de-design'!

On another note, who did these new coke cans? I heard ATTIK were responisble?

On Mar.02.2008 at 11:51 AM

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j’s comment is:

I'm also from Australia, but I have the new US cans and love them.
Also I don't see it worth getting knickers in a knot... why...because basically:
1. the can will change again in a few years
2. they have probably gone for the stripped back look so they can slowly re-introduce other design elements over the coming years! (kind of like the music industry trends... all the young ppl of each generation find what we grew up with and considered 'normal' to be all retro and cool, so by going back to a clean design, it also becomes a new canvas for the next generation of designers and consumers to build upon...
3.It has also clearly streamlines the fact that it's the base flavour leaving the "cherry and vanilla etc" flavours to have something that differs from the original..
p.s love those pepsi cans above, it's a real shame they don't use them
Its kind of like wiping the slate clean but at the same time laying a new foundation for which it can be built upon, because no doubt it will be.

On Apr.04.2008 at 09:36 AM

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Mark’s comment is:

Alex, I miss those cans so much!

Remember the old version of the Diet Pepsi cans? Those we even more awesome!

(Pepsi meets old AT&T logo comes to mind.)

On Apr.04.2008 at 05:52 PM

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raben-aas’s comment is:

I like the new design. Only problem I had with it is that I was in no way PREPARED for it. Yesterday I just went to the supermarket to buy Coke (here in Germany) and voilà – there's the new design. I actually passed the crates three or four times before recognizing it for what it was. And I fear that some if not most other people will have the same trouble at first. I just hope that this possible negative influence on sales will not be "blamed" to the new design, only to the lack of COMMUNICATING it.

BTW: how are they introducing the new design in the US and other regions?

On Apr.18.2008 at 11:39 AM

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Dirty JAX’s comment is:

so much discussion over something so insignificant

On Apr.28.2008 at 03:18 AM

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Peyton’s comment is:

coke is AMAZING!!
:P :D

On May.06.2008 at 02:52 PM

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KD’s comment is:


I love the simplicity. I wish they had taken it further and dropped "classic" altogether. There is no New Coke anymore, just Coke or Coca-Cola. I'd love to see that reality reflected on their packaging. And, yes, I'm a Coke drinker.

On May.07.2008 at 02:19 PM

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RJ’s comment is:

I really like the new design; it's simple and, in my opinion, somewhat elegant. Yes, Coke will probably save money on printing costs, though I find it hard to believe they would go to this aesthetic solely for that purpose (but I'm just a naive student).
Also, the aluminum 20 ounce cans are stunning, if you've had a chance to check them out. I think this is a bold move in the right direction, as the over-saturation of unnecessary (and frivolous) graphic design typically feels like a cover up for a sub-par product. Nice to see that Coke had the confidence to proudly show it's brand maturity which has lasted so many years.

On Jun.24.2008 at 07:08 PM

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JonSel’s comment is:

Turner Duckworth, the designers of the current Coke graphics, just won the first ever Design Lion at the Cannes advertising festival. Seems some others appreciate the simplicity approach too. Nice going, TD!

On Jun.24.2008 at 10:30 PM

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sh’s comment is:

gotham is sooo trendy right now

On Jun.26.2008 at 02:35 AM

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Peter O'Toole’s comment is:

I absolutely love the new (original) design being brought back. I used to collect Coca-Cola memorabilia such as cans and bottles etc and I often wondered why they needed to change from what they used to have which was simple and beautiful to the monsters they unleashed on shelf. So happy someone had the balls to actually go 'NO' to anymore add ons and decided to actually take all of it away to reveal the beauty underneath. The same thing can often be said with girls with too much make-up ;)

On Aug.09.2008 at 06:13 AM

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dianette’s comment is:

Coke have always come up with good designs over the years...

On Dec.03.2008 at 06:00 AM

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jrmm’s comment is:

Here in Mexico, this logo arrived in the beginning of this year... and it looks really great! I agree with dianette, Coca-Cola always had great designs...

On Dec.03.2008 at 11:18 AM

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richard winchell’s comment is:

The Coca-Cola cans here in Vancouver have now dropped the 'classic'. (Which was getting pretty ludicrous, because where has anyone ever found 'New Coke' since Classic was reintroduced?)

On Dec.03.2008 at 02:19 PM

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Brad’s comment is:

To introduce a non-visual talking point, when seeing a large red Coke can and reading JonSel's "....bzzz....snap....crackle...awheeeeeeyoooooo...distortion....static....fade out...." I first thought he was writing out the auditory experience of opening a can of Coke. Then I realized it was static. The sound of opening a can of Coke is one more very powerful element of the Coke experience.

On Dec.03.2008 at 06:12 PM

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popologist’s comment is:

here's how you know coke's new, simpler designs are a success: pepsi followed suit less than a year later. although, ironically, most reviews i've read of the new pepsi design (or, more particularly, the new "globe smilie logo") have been negative.
[img]http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2006/09/09/coke_wideweb__470x388,0.jpg[/img]
http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2006/09/09/coke_wideweb__470x388,0.jpg

On Dec.22.2008 at 01:43 AM

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popologist’s comment is:

oops! here's a link to the new pepsi design.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3013/2984268346_768b347e0b.jpg?v=0

On Dec.22.2008 at 01:45 AM

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Jonathan’s comment is:

Compare this to the comments on the new Pepsi. Interesting what happens when you simplify. Here it's good; Pepsi is the New Coke of designs. Failure.

On Jan.06.2009 at 10:54 PM

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Mark’s comment is:

STILL looks excellent puts Pepsi to shame.

On Jan.07.2009 at 12:27 AM

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Jocko’s comment is:

Well I'm disappointed in you all. I was hoping that it would reveal itself in this long list of comments, but it did not.

The yellow ribbon was a selling of advertising space on behalf of Coke to McDonald's which happened back in 2002/2003. The ribbon of yellow appeared, and then weeks later you would have started to see coupons for McDonald's appearing on select Coke packaging. Look at the color of the golden arches and other McDonald's products. Same yellow as was on the now dated Coke design. Note that the Coke can design prior to the yellow ribbon was pretty much the exact same design.

I was Lovin' that pysch project between these two giants and I felt proud to discover the association!

My suspicion is that it was actually McDonald's idea. But I haven't bothered to research in to either of the companies advertising interests (other than the obvious fact the Coke products are supplied by McDonald's). It could have been McDonald's idea, Coke's or an outsourced agency I suppose.

I'm also seeking employment :)

On Feb.21.2009 at 03:40 AM

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