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Loglobalization

With the onslaught of globalisation branded superpowers leaving cities throughout the world looking similar´┐Ż

A new book called Los logos by Buro Destruct seems to take on logos that look all the same. At least that is the premise. But looking at the sample pages available it looks like they are not following through as advertised. I would not be able to tell what each company does based on those logos, if I had to take a guess I would say the are all in the DJ business. To me it seems like all the logos in those pages looke exactly alike, very WWFT-like, and just too trendy for my taste.

It might be that the purpose of the book is to reflect the actual state of identity work being done in Europe (I think) as opposed to a book about logos that work and aren’t following a trend. In which case, fine, but don’t label a book as showing work that is truly unique and doesn’t leave companies looking similar, when all it’s doing is displaying logos that, although different, have the same monotonous approach.

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ENTRY DETAILS
ARCHIVE ID 1271 FILED UNDER Critique
PUBLISHED ON Oct.14.2002 BY Armin
WITH COMMENTS
Comments
Jon’s comment is:

I think the premise of the book is to decry the fact that you can go to any major (and most minor) cities around the world and find Gap, McDonalds, Levis, Starbucks, etc. Hence, they are showing work, I assume, that is for smaller, locally-based corporations, record labels, fashion houses, etc. On theory, these logos should be informed by and appeal to the local marketplace and not the need to be trusted by 5 billion hungry mouths around the world.

Of course, I make all these assumptions based on the book description and the very small page images I could see.

My guess is it's just another excuse to do a book of trendy logos. Exactly how many of these does the marketplace support, anyway??

On Oct.14.2002 at 01:39 PM
Armin’s comment is:

>and find Gap, McDonalds, Levis, Starbucks, etc.

I see. Still, as much exposure as those brands get, they have much better branding. Maybe it's just because we see them everyday.

>Exactly how many of these does the marketplace support, anyway??

Over 6 Billion. Just like the golden arches.

On Oct.14.2002 at 01:50 PM
Jon’s comment is:

>because we see them everyday

How much does incessant and ubiquitous presence influence successful branding? Seeing Starbucks on every other corner in NY has made me very aware of who they are and what they are about, but it has yet to get me to start drinking coffee. But I do have a somewhat decent view of them. Now on the other had, GEICO has been disturbing me daily for years with their stupid tv commercials. I have a very high recognition of them, but not a lick of esteem.

If it's recognition, that's one thing. But actually creating a brand that people like, trust and have some need for and are willing to bring into their lives? Much harder.

>Over 6 Billion. Just like the golden arches.

Great. I'll stay away from Barnes&Noble (oops...big brand alert) for awhile.

On Oct.14.2002 at 05:27 PM
Armin’s comment is:

>If it's recognition, that's one thing. But actually creating a brand that people like, trust and have some need for and are willing to bring into their lives? Much harder.

I like Starbucks. I like their logo, packaging, the new TV ads, the coffee and the marble loaf is to die for.

>How much does incessant and ubiquitous presence influence successful branding?

Very much I think. People respond to what they are used to, and incessant exposure to a brand creates repetition and becomes comfortable in consumer's lives.

On Oct.15.2002 at 09:23 AM
Rick’s comment is:

Well, this here is an old post, but I had an Amazon gift certificate and I picked it up.

Frst impressions: It's a mishmash of WWFT / Linkdup / K10k logoporn. It's like capoeria: so evolved from what it started out as that it's a new form all its own.

Yeah, some of these could qualify as logos. But much of it is just purty pictures. It's like calling that DepthCore stuff graphic design. Yes, it's in the same neighborhood, yes, it's attractive and maybe inspiring, but no, it isn't real-world.

At least not what I saw with a cursory glance.

On Dec.29.2004 at 12:34 PM
Armin’s comment is:

> It's like calling that DepthCore stuff graphic design.

Sheesh, that stuff is still around?

I think that book has the most rounded-corner-logos ever compiled in one single volume.

On Dec.30.2004 at 01:36 PM