Opinions on corporate and brand identity work.

A division of UnderConsideration.








Share ›

New Logo for Avery by Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv
 

before

after

Established in 1935 as Kum Kleen Products (!), later renamed Avery Adhesives in 1937 until 1990 (with a few variations) when it merged with Dennison Manufacturing, Avery Dennison is a global producer of labeling and packaging materials and solutions with operations in more than 50 countries and 26,000 employees worldwide. In 1982, it launched an office and consumer products division, simply Avery, bringing some of its innovations to the marketplace and is what most of us recognize as Avery and its famed Saul Bass clip logo. On July 2013, Toronto-based CCL Industries purchased the office and consumer product division from Avery Dennison and in order to establish distance from its original ownership, CCL introduced a new logo for the consumer Avery brand, designed by New York, NY-based Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv.

Avery came to Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv [&hellip] for a new visual identity that would more clearly distinguish it from Avery Dennison; be modern and forward-looking; and yet also retain the brand’s recognition in the marketplace. In an additional challenge, the new logo had to work within Avery’s existing package design, which was to remain unchanged. The firm’s solution — a tilted red square positioned behind a redrawn Avery wordmark — recalls Avery’s tilted square while placing the emphasis squarely on the name.

Provided press release

New Logo for Avery by Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv
Logo detail.

To clarify: The Saul Bass clip logo still exists and is still part of Avery Dennison. Yet despite that clarification, the inevitable name/logo confusion is a problem, none of which is C& G & H’s fault; it’s just one of those unfortunate situations where legacy names have different meanings in the business-to-business side and the business-to-consumer site.

With that in mind, C&G&H have done a great job in maintaining a little bit of the visual equity of the old logo — the tilted Saul Bass clip (which was titled by Avery Dennison to signal the difference between its B2B and B2C logos) — by using a simple red, tilted square behind a new extended wordmark. It’s not a POW!-kind of logo, it just gets the job done with enough character of its own. I particularly like the diagonal “Y” approach that creates a nicer ending that matches the opening “A”. We also usually complain about the placement of ™ and ® marks; this one is unobtrusive.

New Logo for Avery by Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv
Packaging. NOTE: C&G&H were not allowed to change the packaging or applications. The logo had to fit in the existing designs.
New Logo for Avery by Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv
Binders.
New Logo for Avery by Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv
Cap.

In application, there really isn’t anything to see as C& G & H did not do much. The logo had to fit in the existing packaging templates and just be able to be dropped in. So there is some dissonance between the new, clean logo and the existing, weird mixture of typefaces and colors. Overall, it’s a change that makes sense and has been carried out efficiently and elegantly.

And, now, hopefully as the first of many to come, we welcome Tony Spaeth’s comments in:

Tony Spaeth

Tony’s Take
There is a law of branding — call it the Not All Ours law — that says “It’s never a good idea to use a mark you don’t completely own,” or to rely on names or logos (no matter how familiar or beloved) whose future meaning you can’t fully control.

Violations, or at least vulnerabilities, are often triggered when companies spin out a branded business, yet retain for themselves vestiges of the spun-out brand. We see this in Avery Dennison’s spinout (last July) of its Avery-branded consumer products division, which included rights to continued (but not exclusive) use of the Avery name… rights to the name, that is, but evidently not the symbol. In addition to retaining the “Avery” in its own name, Avery Dennison chose to keep for itself the Bass-designed paperclip “A” symbol. At first, the spun-out Avery presumed to keep its red A too, containing it in a canted blue box in hopes of differentiating it from Avery Dennison’s red A — but no dice, so Avery then agreed “to represent ourselves in a different way,” thus triggering the nicely executed Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv assignment.

As the dust settles, we now have two Avery’s in the office products category, each with a brand “Not All Ours,” thus each at the mercy of the other’s future behavior, performance and reputation.

Your opinion…

On Logo Evolution


Total
See what else happened on Brand New each year since publication began in 2006

Comments


Share ›

Spotted Around the web

New Logo for Revolut

New Logo for Revolut
 
Spotted Mar. 26, 2020

New Logo for Aunt Bessie’s

New Logo for Aunt Bessie's
 
Spotted Mar. 25, 2020

New Logo for 2Simple

New Logo for 2Simple
 
Spotted Mar. 25, 2020

New Logo for Techstars

New Logo for Techstars
 
Spotted Mar. 24, 2020

Pinned Recent, Big Stories


Curated MELLOW YELLOW