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New Name and Logo for Equinor by Superunion
 

before

after

Noted Apr. 5, 2018 by Armin

Industry / Corporate Tags /

About

(Est. 1972) “Statoil is a Norwegian multinational oil and gas company headquartered in Stavanger, Norway. It is a fully integrated petroleum company with operations in thirty-six countries. By revenue, Statoil is ranked by Forbes Magazine (2013) as the world’s eleventh largest oil and gas company and the twenty-sixth largest company, regardless of industry, by profit in the world. The company has about 20,500 employees. On March 15, 2018, Statoil announced that its board of directors proposes to change the name of the company to Equinor, subject to approval by shareholders at the Annual General Meeting to be held on May 15.” (Wikipedia)

Design by

Superunion

Related links

Statoil press release
Superunion news page
2009 Brand New Noted post

Relevant quote
The name Equinor is formed by combining “equi”, the starting point for words like equal, equality and equilibrium, and “nor”, signalling a company proud of its Norwegian origin, and who wants to use this actively in its positioning.

Statoil press release

Images (opinion after)
New Name and Logo for Equinor by Superunion
Logo.
Very long, very involved way of announcing the name change. Logo animation at the end.
Opinion

While I wasn’t a fan of the 3D treatment of the star icon in the old logo, I liked its composition and it managed to be one of those successful abstract corporate logos à la Chase. The old wordmark was nice; perhaps more appropriate for a fashion brand than an oil company but it was different and elegant. This new persona and logo are weird. While the name is completely different — and totally ambiguous — the icon is conceptually the same so to me it sends conflicting messages of changing but not changing but yes changing but not changing too much but yes changing a lot. Hard to explain. But if they were interested in keeping the icon, I don’t understand why they messed with it in such weird ways: why flip it and rotate it and loosen it? It’s a much weaker symbol now with all the pieces floating in space and creating very awkward counterspaces. The lock-up with the wordmark is odd too, making the big piece of the icon look enormous. The wordmark is sort of — sort of — interesting with one of the angles in the icon shapes echoed in the cuts of the letters. I feel like this really needed an uppercase “E” so that the wordmark held its ground better in contrast with the large icon and also because, fuck, this is a giant oil corporation… capitalize it like grown-ups, please. I’m almost certain we will have a follow-up post once the name is properly adopted on May 15 and more images are released but, in the meantime, the outcome is not very sunny.

Thanks to Jon Cleon for the tip.

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