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AIGA NY › Lorraine Wild: Full Stride


Lorraine Wild: Full Stride
Thursday 10 November 2005

Haft Auditorium, F.I.T. Building C
27th Street, between 7th & 8th Avenues
6:30 to 7:00 p.m. Reception
7:00 to 8:30 p.m. Presentation

Lorraine Wild — designer, writer and historian — will be traveling from the West Coast to walk us through the creative gamut of a career that, to this day, remains in full stride. She will talk about the many things that make up her long-standing practice: book design, exhibit design, writing, and more.

Lorraine’s work has been published in I.D., Print, Design Quarterly, Eye, and in the anthologies The Graphic Edge, Typography Now and Typography Now:Two. Her writing has appeared in numerous periodicals and books, including Emigre, I.D., Print, Graphic Design in America, Cranbrook Design: The New Discourse and Looking Closer. She has received awards from the ACD, AIGA and I.D., and has also been a recipient of the Chrysler Award for Innovation in Design. Her publication designs were recently the subject of an exhibit at SFMOMA. She received her bachelor’s degree from Cranbrook Academy of Art and her master’s degree from Yale University.

Admission
Advanced registration
$15 AIGA members
$10 AIGA student members
$25 General public
register

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ENTRY DETAILS
ARCHIVE ID 2467 FILED UNDER News/Events
PUBLISHED ON Nov.07.2005 BY Speak Up
WITH COMMENTS
Comments
Carl Williamson’s comment is:

Does anyone else think that $25 is a tad bit extreme for the general public to pay to attend this lecture. Not to launch into the vurtues and vices of joining the AIGA, but i would have to go to 8.4 lectures at the same price to recoup my associate membership cost (210 dollars), are there even that many events? Few music shows of the same ilk cost that much!

On Nov.10.2005 at 09:52 AM
Armin’s comment is:

Carl, each person assesses the value of these events differently — and decide whether $25 is worth spending. From personal experience, I can say they are worth it — but that's just me. Unless the speaker sucks, but you never know that going in. Surely, though, I would not call it "extreme".

> are there even that many events?

Yesterday we had Joshua Davis for the Small Talk series, tonight is Lorraine Wild, next week we will have the popular Draw and next month we will have Rick Valicenti, the Holiday Sale and Charles Wilkin in the last Small Talk of the season. So, yes, there are that many events. We try to have at least three to four events each month. More than that, and we spread ourselves too thin as well as our members' and non-members' budgets and time.

So, see you there tonight?

On Nov.10.2005 at 11:47 AM
debbie millman’s comment is:

having just come from the event, i would say that yes, $25 was worth it. and then some.

On Nov.10.2005 at 11:15 PM
Bryony’s comment is:

Given the amount of events each month and their variety, the amount of information provided by AIGA (you don't even have to research the names that are unknown to you prior to the event if you don't want to) and the experiences I have gathered, the notes I have accumulated, the sketches and the ideas... It has been worth it. It shall continue to be worth it. And I look forward to all that is to come.

To all the board members and staff of the many chapters of the AIGA: Keep up the good work, and thank you.

On Nov.11.2005 at 08:29 AM
Carl Williamson’s comment is:

I think the events are worth a price, but not such a steep one in my opinion. Its hard to argue for a non-designer friend to spend 25 dollars to attend a lecture by a graphic designer whose work they might be unfamiliar with. It might be a feeble comparison but, attending music shows by artists who i am unfamiliar with is more economically feasible than attending most AIGA lectures. I know that the AIGA ny board works very hard and does good programming (there are no complaints there) but it is difficult as young designer to fork out 210 dollars a year, or 25 dollars per lecture when you have to pay your own health insurance etc. One chooses how they spend their own money which is understandable. But...

Maybe it is a student mentality, or maybe I have just taken for granted that higher education institutions foot the bill for lecturers for prestige, but when friends invite me to hear an artist or an intellectual speak at NYU or Columbia or CUNY or the New School there is never a 25 dollar 'cover' to hear them speak about their work or intellectual property.

I don't want to say the AIGA is not worth it, but it is not in the process of encouraging the non-design community to embrace hearing what designers have to say outside of their printed work or monograph which they might find in a library for free. Of course it is not their responsibity to act as an institution of higher learning or to use members dues to foot the bill for such events to be free, but I think its interesting that its one of the most expensive ways to hear someone lecture about their own intellectual/artistic property/work in New York City.

On Nov.11.2005 at 10:04 AM
Carl Williamson’s comment is:

I think the events are worth a price, but not such a steep one in my opinion. Its hard to argue for a non-designer friend to spend 25 dollars to attend a lecture by a graphic designer whose work they might be unfamiliar with. It might be a feeble comparison but, attending music shows by artists who i am unfamiliar with is more economically feasible than attending most AIGA lectures. I know that the AIGA ny board works very hard and does good programming (there are no complaints there) but it is difficult as young designer to fork out 210 dollars a year, or 25 dollars per lecture when you have to pay your own health insurance etc. One chooses how they spend their own money which is understandable. But...

Maybe it is a student mentality, or maybe I have just taken for granted that higher education institutions foot the bill for lecturers for prestige, but when friends invite me to hear an artist or an intellectual speak at NYU or Columbia or CUNY or the New School there is never a 25 dollar 'cover' to hear them speak about their work or intellectual property.

I don't want to say the AIGA is not worth it, but it is not in the process of encouraging the non-design community to embrace hearing what designers have to say outside of their printed work or monograph which they might find in a library for free. Of course it is not their responsibity to act as an institution of higher learning or to use members dues to foot the bill for such events to be free, but I think its interesting that its one of the most expensive ways to hear someone lecture about their own intellectual/artistic property/work in New York City.

On Nov.11.2005 at 10:04 AM
graham’s comment is:

hello carl . . . maybe look out for the next one of these. the tokion creativity now weekends are definitely the best line-up and value i've come across when it comes to these sorts of things.

On Nov.11.2005 at 10:11 AM
Colleen Miller’s comment is:

Since I decided to attend at the last minute, I paid $30 at the door. My husband and I choose to have one AIGA membership between us at the moment since he is a full-time MFA student. We receive all of the announcements anyway, so I pay "full price" general admission until we can afford membership again!

My problem with the cost, at least last night was that certain things didn't line up well for me. The description of the event stated "Lorraine Wild....will talk about the many things that make up her long-standing practice: book design, exhibit design, writing, and more." But last night, she decided to exclusively discuss book design, which was a tad disappointing as I expected a broader career discussion. Then, as she spoke directly to the design layouts of her slides, the room was too bright and the slides were too light to be viewable to the audience. Every slide for the first half of the presentation was blown-out to the point that I had no idea what she was talking about.

Q&A was shaping up to be a more intriguing discussion on her career, but as the slide presentation ran long, the Q&A was cut short. I guess it didn't matter much anyway since the questions from the audience could not be heard, and Lorraine did not repeat the questions. I was surprised by the fact that such a well-noted educator did not think to repeat the questions before launching into a response so everyone could hear.

At most lectures, I find the admission expense worth the price. Last night my $30 would have been better spent on a few drinks at happy hour.

On Nov.11.2005 at 11:13 AM
Gunnar Swanson’s comment is:

One can never make the decision of whether something is “worth it” for someone else. As someone who ran events for AIGA/LA fifteen years ago, I can tell you that it is very hard to run such events without high prices and/or large subsidies. Leaving things to institutions with a budget would mean that the choices will always be determined by those institutions.

I’m sorry to hear that there were technical problems with Lorraine’s talk. I can say that I’ve been to a couple of conferences (that cost me well over $30) where Lorraine gave talks that were the highlight for me. Her career has been varied but certainly her books are both a main focus and an area of exceptional accomplishment.

Too bad the Q&A got cut short. She’s a very interesting conversationalist.

On Nov.11.2005 at 04:24 PM