Opinions on corporate and brand identity work.

A division of UnderConsideration.








Share ›

This is a very old entry — images are small, formatting is off.

 

Kraft Logo Gets Back in the Race

Reviewed Oct. 4, 2012 by Armin

Industry / Corporate Tags /

Kraft Food Group Logo, Before and After

The saga of the Kraft logo continues and, possibly, ends this month. It all started on February 2009 when Kraft Foods Inc., the corporation, not Kraft, the consumer brand, redesigned its logo to this horrible thing. Five months later they flipped the starburst to the other side and changed the colors. Then, as reported here, Kraft Foods Inc. had announced in August of 2011 that it would split its company in two: (1) Mondelez, for the global snacks business and now (2) Kraft Foods Group (not Kraft Foods Inc.) for the North American grocery business, managing brands like the eponymous Kraft as well as Maxwell House, Oscar Mayer, Planters, and JELL-O. As of October 1, 2012, Kraft Foods Group is officially a start-up or, as they describe it, a “new company that has been around 109 years” that also happens to have revenues of approximately $19 billion in 2011. A new logo was introduced with the new company. No design credit given.

“Today is the beginning of a great new company, a totally new Kraft, one with the spirit of a startup and the soul of a powerhouse,” said Vernon. “We are proud of our rich history and deeply passionate about Kraft’s future. We see this as an opportunity to build something extraordinary, to create a renaissance in the North American food & beverage industry.”
Press Release

Kraft Food Group Logo

Kraft Food Group Logo

Old and new “race track” logos.

Above all, it’s a pleasure to see the starburst logo be a casualty of the split. It was one of the worst corporate logos in recent years. The new corporate logo adopts a redesigned version of the well-known consumer logo found on the sides, fronts, and or/backs of mayo and mac and cheese and other Kraft foodstuffs. I am assuming — more like hoping — that the new lowercase version of the corporate logo will also be used on the consumer level because otherwise it would be a disaster. Comparing the two “race track” logos, the change is evident, going from a minimally flared sans serif in uppercase to a Gotham-esque sans serif set in title case. The change is welcome. The new logo feels much softer and friendlier and, somehow, I feel like the type sits better inside that weird shape than the previous version. The holding shape has also been modified slightly, being like 5% taller. To complement the launch, Kraft Foods Group has been using a bold, stencil font (shown below) that has little to do with anything and I see no relevant reasoning to using it. But, what the hell, it’s fun to look at. What it does say, along with the logo, is that, as a corporation, Kraft is definitely trying to behave differently, more fun and loose, so it should be interesting to see how it keeps evolving.

Kraft Food Group Logo

Tsk tsk on that “98%”. Why scale it horizontally?

Kraft Food Group Logo

Kraft Food Group Logo

Thanks to Marc Nijborg for the tip.

 

Comments


Share ›

Spotted Around the web

New Logo for iMore

New Logo for iMore
 
Spotted Apr. 28, 2017

New Logo for Live Nation

New Logo for Live Nation
 
Spotted Apr. 26, 2017

Pinned Recent, Big Stories

New Logo for NASCAR

New Logo for NASCAR
 
Posted Jan. 4, 2017

Curated Best Posts with Script Logos

Brandiose is Grandiose

Brandiose is Grandiose
 
Posted Feb. 9, 2012

Little Chef, Big Dreams

Little Chef, Big Dreams
 
Posted May. 19, 2011
 
 

About

Brand New, is a division of UnderConsideration, displaying opinions, and focusing solely, on corporate and brand identity work. More…

UnderConsideration is a graphic design firm generating its own projects, initiatives, and content while taking on limited client work. Run by Bryony Gomez-Palacio and Armin Vit in Austin, TX.

Many Thanks to our Advertisers

When choosing between competing products and services, please consider our advertisers, who help support Brand New.

Typography

Brand New uses Mercury Text ScreenSmart and Operator ScreenSmart from Hoefler & Co.

Webfonts by Hoefler & Co.

Join our Mailing List