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New Logo and Identity for The Hershey Company done In-house with goDutch

Kiss me I'm Chocolate

New Logo and Identity for The Hershey Company done In-house with goDutch
 

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Reviewed August 28, 201408.28.14 by Armin

filed under Corporate and tagged with , ,

Established in 1909 by Milton S. Hershey in Pennsylvania, The Hershey Company is a global confectionery producer with more than 80 individual brands around the world. These span from the eponymous Hershey’s to Reese’s to Kisses to Jolly Ranchers to Twizzlers and more. Over 13,000 employees across the globe help The Hershey Company achieve their promise, of “Bringing Goodness to the World”. Now, the parent company is getting a little bit of that goodness of its own with a redesigned logo and supporting identity designed by Hershey Global Design — led by Ron Burrage, Sr. Director Global Head of Design — and Cincinnati, OH-based goDutch with a custom font by New York, NY-based Alexander Design Associates.

Our guiding principle during the design and development process was to stay true to the rich Hershey legacy, while at the same time, signaling the company’s evolution from a predominately U.S. chocolate maker to a global confection and snack company.

Central to the visual identity system is the new logo - built upon the globally recognized HERSHEY logotype used on its famous Hershey’s chocolate bar and a fresh and modern interpretation of the beloved KISSES icon.

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New Logo and Identity for The Hershey Company done In-house with goDutch
Logo detail.

The old logo featured the typography straight from the flagshipp Hershey’s bar, apostrophe and all, along with a literal rendering of another popular product, a Kiss. I’ve never really thought about The Hershey Company as having a logo, it just seemed like a still life of their products that never quite felt official. The new logo is now more clearly a corporate mark, formally integrated and more easily recognizable and reproducible. What’s great is that it’s basically the same elements as before but with more intention. The new wordmark showcases the chocolate bar typography sans the beveling — I particularly enjoy the detail of the “R” cradling the “S” — and a flat Kiss that’s as recognizable in a single color as it is as a full-color photograph. Repeating “The Hershey Company” under “Hershey” still seems odd, but I guess it is what it is.

New Logo and Identity for The Hershey Company done In-house with goDutch
New “Milton” typeface by Alexander Design Associates.

The custom font looks solid and sturdy, with each letter tight and condensed like a single brick of the chocolate bar. A couple of letters have some nice character to them, like the “J” and “Q”.

New Logo and Identity for The Hershey Company done In-house with goDutch
Kiss Icon detail.

I guess you could argue that if the Kiss is brown it’s been stripped off its foil wrapper, yet the paper ribbon still remains — which would break the Kisses law of physics. But it does make for a quick read. So, yeah, it’s something we can argue about.

The new logo is complimented by a new, disciplined visual identity system that is inspired by the famous colors of its most iconic brands, including Hershey’s, Reese’s and Ice Breakers, to bring a consistent look to all of the company’s visual materials.

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New Logo and Identity for The Hershey Company done In-house with goDutch
Branded icon.
New Logo and Identity for The Hershey Company done In-house with goDutch
Business cards.
New Logo and Identity for The Hershey Company done In-house with goDutch
Collateral.
Brand grid, animated.

Not much to see in application. There are some patterns that you can see in the business cards and video above that are taken from the products; you can discern the Kisses one while the red is for Twizzlers, orange for Reese’s, and blue one for Ice Breakers. Despite having the new custom font, it doesn’t seem to appear in application yet, opting instead for the popular Brandon Grotesque to carry the weight. Overall, this is a really nice update that gives The Hershey Company its own voice that, although it remains tied to its brand products, gives it independence to communicate in a cohesive visual language.

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