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New Packaging for Evolution Harvest and Not So New Packaging for Evolution Fresh by Hornall Anderson

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Established in 1992 by Jimmy Rosenberg — who previously established Naked Juice and sold it to PepsiCo — Evolution Fresh, purchased by Starbucks in 2011, is a line of “cold-pressed/high pressure processed” juices whereby produce is pulverized to pack more stuff per serving and then stored for longer periods of time. The premise is that this is juicier juice. (More about this trend here). The Evolution Fresh bottle label was redesigned back in 2012 by Seattle, WA-based Hornall Anderson — here is their case study — and started appearing in Starbucks locations, followed by the launch of its own store, and most recently the opening of a brand new $70-million/264,000-square-foot production facility, it is now poised to break bigger with national distribution in Whole Foods. Along with Evolution Fresh, Starbucks has now introduced Evolution Harvest, a line of bars, trail mixes, and fruit snacks made from natural ingredients; first sold in select Whole Foods, these will now be sold broadly and in Starbucks locations. The packaging was designed by Hornall Anderson as well. This post is a joint look at the two Evolution products, starting with the relatively “old” juice redesign as a basis for the look of the newer snacks.

New Packaging for Evolution Harvest and Not So New Packaging for Evolution Fresh by Hornall Anderson
Watercolor sketches.
Intro to Evolution Fresh and its design.
Key to communicating the vibrancy of the Evolution Fresh offering, both on package and in retail, is a series of handcrafted “flavor sunbursts” that represent the full spectrum of juice blends and their ingredients. The sunbursts are an artful abstraction of the raw fruits and vegetables that are found in each beverage. And with more than 20 different ready to drink beverages, these varied representations boldly convey the taste and freshness that consumers can expect from cold-crafted juice, while differentiating each juice blend from the next.

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New Packaging for Evolution Harvest and Not So New Packaging for Evolution Fresh by Hornall Anderson
Flavor sunbursts.
New Packaging for Evolution Harvest and Not So New Packaging for Evolution Fresh by Hornall Anderson
Flavor sunbursts detail.
New Packaging for Evolution Harvest and Not So New Packaging for Evolution Fresh by Hornall Anderson
Evolution Fresh juices.
New Packaging for Evolution Harvest and Not So New Packaging for Evolution Fresh by Hornall Anderson
Evolution Fresh juices chillin’.

To me, this identity is all about the flavor sunbursts. We’ve seen watercolor applied in other projects but here it definitely helps to break away from the mainstream approach of putting fruit and vegetable illustrations on the label. While they do not provide an instant view of what’s included in each juice, I am sure that people who buy what are considered to be premium juices, have the ability to read the ingredients listed on the front label. The hand-drawn approach, popular in organic food products, works perfectly well here. The “evolution” wordmark could have used a little bit more love, particularly in the “evo” part. While it’s commendable that they stuck with the raw, organic feel, it could have still been refined.

New Packaging for Evolution Harvest and Not So New Packaging for Evolution Fresh by Hornall Anderson
Evolution Harvest and Evolution Fresh logos.
New Packaging for Evolution Harvest and Not So New Packaging for Evolution Fresh by Hornall Anderson
Evolution Harvest freeze-dried fruits.
New Packaging for Evolution Harvest and Not So New Packaging for Evolution Fresh by Hornall Anderson
Detail of freeze-dried fruits.
New Packaging for Evolution Harvest and Not So New Packaging for Evolution Fresh by Hornall Anderson
Evolution Harvest trailmix.
New Packaging for Evolution Harvest and Not So New Packaging for Evolution Fresh by Hornall Anderson
Evolution Harvest snack bars.

The watercolor, layered approach works craftily in the new range of snack packages and the wordmark works better here as white on color than color on white as it appears on the labels. The secondary typography is a nice contrasting choice to the bold wordmark but the type nerd in me really wants that to be an OpenType font that doesn’t allow for the repeating of characters to create a more convincing hand-made look. Nonetheless, the Harvest line exudes so much natural-ness it’s almost unfair to the Cheetos of the world — from the freeze-dried bags to the bar packets, these look delicious and healthy, crisp and clean.

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