Reviewed

Frizz, New

Living Proof considers itself a rather unconventional beauty product company — gathering scientists outside of the beauty field under Bob Langer, an MIT Institute Professor, lead by the former Senior VP of Marketing for L’Oreal and backed by Polaris Venture Partners in Cambridge. Their first product to get out in the wild is a line of No Frizz solutions that employ PolyfluoroEster rather than the traditional method of utilizing silicone — they’ve got a great video describing the process on their products page (right column, “watch” button). Living Proof’s elevator pitch:

Living Proof was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and created for the purpose of solving the toughest beauty challenges. we are able to do this by inventing efficient, single-purpose formulas based on entirely new molecules and breakthrough technologies. We are a team of scientists and beauty authorities brought together by a shared aspiration: to challenge the status quo and end the common beauty frustrations of people everywhere?—?once and for all. This is how we define technological breakthrough, how we define true innovation. This is our mission.

Frizz, New

Bob Langer at work.

Frizz, New

Frizz. No frizz.

Frizz, New

This is another branding job by Wolf Ollins, the powerhouse of recent 2012 Olympics fame and controversy. The identity is made up less of a conventional logo and more of a branding compound consisting of one part packaging shapes, one part color palette and two parts typography (DTL Documenta). It’s a sophisticated approach, using just a few brand elements and some smart copy to play the line between high fashion and pharmaceutical formulas. There is a refreshing clarity to the composition and directness of language that is vaguely reminiscent of the annual report work of Bill Cahan’s outfit (certainly others in this category, Cahan came to mind first). While overall there is some familiarity with the conceptual approach that Prada took several years ago with their skin care products (examples here, here and here) this work is exceptional in its execution — from the formal attributes of the bottles to the understated struck-through “frizz” product name. Love the work or hate it, Wolf Ollins continuously displays their spry flexibility. More brand images can be found here.

Frizz, New

Frizz, New

Frizz, New

filed under Consumer products and tagged with

Reviewed February 24, 200902.24.09 by Christian Palino


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