Reviewed

Comedy Network Logo, Before and After

Launched in 1997 in Canada, The Comedy Network is, as its name implies, a channel devoted to all things funny. Its programming consists of a selection of existing programming from other channels including Comedy Central (The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, Tosh.0), TBS (Conan), and NBC (Up all Night, Whitney). It also sprinkles in some original programming. Yesterday, The Comedy Network introduced a new logo, on-air look, and advertising all designed, from what I can gather, in-house, through the parent company, Bell Media.

Simple yet limitless in its potential use, the fun and colourful new branding for Comedy allows for the channel’s personalities to be integrated into applications of the new elements. […]

“Our ultimate goal with this rebrand is to develop a new look that’s fresh, spirited and has the versatility to work on every platform,” said Jon Arklay, Vice-President, Creative and Brand, Bell Media Agency. “Be it on-air, in print or on digital platforms, this is a new image that connects us with comedy in all media.”
Press Release

Comedy Network

To call the old logo a logo is an insult to all other logos that actually try to do their job with integrity. Why anyone thought a Crayola-lettered logo would be funny is beyond me. Sad? Yes. Funny? No. The new logo is sad in a much different way but in a similar deeply wrong and misguided way as the previous. Set in Gill Ultra Sans, the new “Comedy” logo is based on the ubiquity of Gill Sans Ultra in run of the mill Hollywood comedies — see: Alvin and the Chipmunks or Dodgeball as two examples — and, well, that’s it. There is nothing else to the logo other than the fact that Gill Ultra Sans is kind of funny. But the kind of funny where we laugh at it, not with it. There is no further attempt to do anything with the typography in the application, it just sits there.

Comedy Network

Stills from promo video available here. Screen grabs by Branding Source.

Comedy Network

Comedy Network

Comedy Network

The rest of the identity and advertising are as unexciting as the logo, using Gotham (or Avenir?) to set the name of the show really big and use the star of the show in place of one of the letters of the show. Whoopee. This just goes to show you how brilliant Comedy Central’s identity is and how easy it is to be unfunny when one is trying to be funny.

Thanks to Kyle Richmond for the tip.

filed under Entertainment and tagged with , ,

Reviewed November 2, 201111.02.11 by Armin


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