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New Logo and Identity for Princes Square by Shine
 

before

after

Noted Jul. 14, 2017 by Armin

Industry / Retailers Tags /

About

(Est. 1988) “Princes Square [in Glasgow, Scotland] opened in its current format as a shopping and dining destination in 1988. Now owned by Redevco, the centre has recently undergone a £7.5m refurbishment. The original buildings consisted of a 4 storey merchant square built in yellow sandstone and completed in 1841. The then owner, James Campbell, was knighted by Queen Victoria and later became Lord Provost of Glasgow. In celebration of the birth of the Prince of Wales, later to become Edward VII, he named his new building Princes Square. The Grade B listed buildings were developed by GRE Properties Ltd in the 1980s. The brief then was to preserve and restore the original buildings but create a modern shopping and dining centre of quality and distinction with an emphasis on style - which remains within the centre today.”

Design by

Shine (Glasgow, Scotland)

Related links

Shine project page
Martyn Gallagher project page

Images (opinion after)
New Logo and Identity for Princes Square by Shine
Composite sketch image.
New Logo and Identity for Princes Square by Shine
Logo.
New Logo and Identity for Princes Square by Shine
New Logo and Identity for Princes Square by Shine
New Logo and Identity for Princes Square by Shine
Different kinds of bags.
New Logo and Identity for Princes Square by Shine
New Logo and Identity for Princes Square by Shine
Production details.
New Logo and Identity for Princes Square by Shine
Indoor ad.
New Logo and Identity for Princes Square by Shine
Holiday campaign.
Opinion

The old logo already referenced the peacock on the facade of the building with an ornate tail on the “Q” of the wordmark. Not amazing, but pretty enough. The new logo adds a lovely rendering of the peacock that makes the shopping center feel more regal. I would have gotten rid of (or at least minimized) the ornate “Q” — as now it might be too much of a good thing — and introduced a cooler serif, perhaps something much bolder to create contrast with the thinner lines of the icon. In application, the icon looks best on its own, as in the white t-shirt image (where the tag also has the icon slightly isolated) and it lends itself well to all kinds of fancy printing methods. The big indoor ad cleverly (although not entirely successfully) integrates images into the angles of the icon. The holiday campaign is nice too. Overall, the addition of the peacock makes for a good upscale aesthetic without being overly fancy.

Your opinion…

On Icon


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On Wordmark


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On Application


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Comments


Logo Before & After
Sample Application

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