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This is a very old entry — images are small, formatting is off.

 

Ben There, Done That

Reviewed Oct. 24, 2011 by Armin

Industry / Retailers Tags /

Ben Sherman Logo, Before and After

Founded in 1963 in Brighton, UK by Ben Sherman (neé Arthur Benjamin Sugarman), Ben Sherman is one of the most iconic clothing brands in both the UK and the world. Best known for its defining button-down shirts, Ben Sherman has maintained cult status for a remarkable five decades, transcending whatever the fashion of the moment is. Since July (or perhaps June) the Ben Sherman website has been showing a simple sans serif logo but acknowledging that the site was an interim version to a brand new site, so it seemed as if the logo was not a definite change. But this past September, with the opening of a new concept store in their flagship location on Carnaby Street, it remains no doubt that this is the new look for Ben Sherman. Designed in-house, the logo and identity have been brought to life in a retail environment by Brinkworth.

Brinkworth have produced a global retail concept for Ben Sherman. References to icons of British design, such as pubs, pie and mash shops and London Underground stations make a strong visual statement, and a fresh environment for the legendary brand.
Brinkworth Project Page

A look at the new store.

Ben Sherman

Ben Sherman

Ben Sherman

Ben Sherman

Ben Sherman

Ben Sherman

The launch of the Plectrum line was first to indicate a new type language.

The previous logo, although not pretty at all nor necessarily reflective of the streamlined lines of the shirts it lived on, had enough equity to sink down the whole island of Great Britain, so it’s quite surprising to see it change to something as nondescript as the new wordmark. Typeset in a condensed sans serif — I’m not even sure what exactly it is… typophiles, any clues? — the logo is as sterile as it gets in the fashion industry but somehow it manages to exude more coolness than any fashion brand trying enormously hard to appear cool. The reality is that this is thanks to the context of where the logo now lives. The new store, the decor, the staff with unnatural facial hair, and, yes, the clothes themselves are what give the logo its personality. Without any of it, the logo is indeed, nothing. But since you can’t really extract the logo out of the whole Ben Sherman legend, a generic condensed sans serif fits it just right.

Thanks to Amy Maw for the tip.

 

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