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New Logo for City of Newcastle by Headjam and In-house
 

before

after

Noted Feb. 28, 2019 by Armin

Industry / Destinations Tags /

About

City of Newcastle is a local government authority in NSW, Australia. Council employs over 900 staff helping residents and visitors live, work and play in Newcastle. Newcastle has six beaches, two ocean baths, five inland pools, 630km of footpaths, 350 parks and fields, 118 playgrounds, 634 buildings and structures, 798.5km of roads and plenty more. Council also manages Newcastle Art Gallery, Newcastle Museum, Civic Theatre and nine branch libraries. The council is responsible for looking after public facilities and providing community services.”

Design by

In-house
Headjam (Newcastle, Australia)

Related links

City of Newcastle news page

Relevant quote
As a progressive, dynamic and rapidly changing City, it was important that our logo complements Newcastle’s transformation from a regional town into a smart, liveable and sustainable global city.

The logo is a stylised ‘N’ with a ripple effect that represents water, as a strong symbol and shared connection across our coastal city. The vibrant palette captures the beauty of Newcastle’s natural environment and represents the city’s bright outlook.

City of Newcastle news page

Images (opinion after)
Logo introduction.
New Logo for City of Newcastle by Headjam and In-house
Logo.
New Logo for City of Newcastle by Headjam and In-house
Facility logos.
Opinion

The old logo was extra busy with the arches graphic and the wave graphic and the high-contrast serif. I don’t really know anything about the City of Newcastle but based on the new logo I would think it has something to do with water and technology — it’s a coastal city, so that part is on point and the release says it’s a “progressive, dynamic and rapidly changing” city so we’ll assume that is correct. The ripple effect in the “N” is nicely executed with the pieces getting smaller as they expand and their connecting elements narrowing down as well. I think the gradients could have been a little more exaggerated instead of being contained to just the connective parts. But the overall effect, especially when seeing the logo small, is fairly pleasing. The wordmark is fine… perhaps in black it’s a little too stark but it’s well sized in relationship to the monogram. There is not a whole lot more on this one but I thought the new “N” monogram was interesting enough to merit a post.

Thanks to Nick S for the tip.

Your opinion…

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Logo Before & After
Logo detail

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