Opinions on corporate and brand identity work.

A division of UnderConsideration.








Share ›

New Name, Logo, and Identity for Storey by DixonBaxi

New

Launched this month, Storey is a new range of flexible workspaces offered by British Land, one of Europe’s largest real estate investment companies offering commercial properties. Storey will focus on providing office space for companies employing between 20 and 70 people — a range that is apparently hard to find space for — and will operate within British Land’s existing London, UK, assets where 80,000 square feet of flexible workspace is already being fitted out and an additional 80,000 square feet of space has been earmarked for a further wave of openings. Storey’s name and identity were conceived by London-based DixonBaxi.

DixonBaxi originated a new name - Storey - to capture the focus of the brand and service. More than a building - it’s about the people and businesses inside. Supporting and amplifying their culture, productivity and work - ultimately helping tell their story.

As every business is unique it was clear that a one size fits all approach wasn’t right. The Storey identity adapts. It flexes in form, colour, pattern, size and shape. Just like the different needs and states of a business.

DixonBaxi provided text

Brand introduction.

The name, Storey, is fairly literal, referencing actual stories — as in floors of a building — that also has the benefit of sounding like “story”, as in those things you tell. In American English, the correlation would be more straightforward as the spelling is the same but, in British English, it leaves room for the audience to make that jump. As a name for a range of what will probably be groovy office spaces, it’s fitting and feels almost like a furniture line name from Herman Miller, making the offering seem more special than just some walls and a WiFi connection.

The Storey symbol uses two overlapping shapes as a simple expression of partnership, of working together. The blue is taken from the from British Land palette creating a subtle link, while the red adds a sense of energy and attitude.

The identity is hugely versatile. The shapes can be scaled, rotated, flipped and filled with pattern to tell mini visual stories to reflect ideas of growth, collaboration and productivity.

Working with Reed Words we developed a distinct tone of voice that is smart and simple with a touch of character. And a photographic direction that features living, breathing spaces with graphic compositions of people focused on work rather than simply empty building spaces.

DixonBaxi provided text

New Name, Logo, and Identity for Storey by DixonBaxi
Logo.

The logo on its own is… awkward. There is no clear connection or literal/metaphorical association between the shapes and the name or why the “O” is white or why you could fit an office of 5 people between each letter - 7 or 10 between the “E” and the “Y”, if you got creative. While the logo is not the most appealing or efficient, it lays the groundwork for more interesting applications.

New Name, Logo, and Identity for Storey by DixonBaxi
New Name, Logo, and Identity for Storey by DixonBaxi
Brand icons, static and animated.

Mainly, the tiny graphic stories above that are mostly literal interpretations of the words but that — in either static or animated form (obviously better animated) — help set the tone for what Storey spaces are about.

New Name, Logo, and Identity for Storey by DixonBaxi
New Name, Logo, and Identity for Storey by DixonBaxi
Various materials.
New Name, Logo, and Identity for Storey by DixonBaxi
Welcome kit.
New Name, Logo, and Identity for Storey by DixonBaxi
New Name, Logo, and Identity for Storey by DixonBaxi
Posters.
New Name, Logo, and Identity for Storey by DixonBaxi
Ad.
New Name, Logo, and Identity for Storey by DixonBaxi
Bag.

The applications are interesting in how the different shapes can be used as overlays, masks, and other arrangements. Nothing overly novel but engaging nonetheless. I think I would have liked to see the font used in the logo extended into the applications, which would give it a more industrial feel instead of the let’s-be-friends sans serif chosen that doesn’t blend as well with the off-kilter range of shapes. The logo also feels like it gets in the way, as the eye wants to create a link between the larger shapes in the layout and the shapes in the logo but they just don’t gel together.

New Name, Logo, and Identity for Storey by DixonBaxi
New Name, Logo, and Identity for Storey by DixonBaxi
Launch event space.

Perhaps the best expression of the brand is the space set up for the launch event, where the literally larger canvases allow for the shapes to take over more fully and there is a more interesting combination of graphic shapes and building materials. Overall, this is fun at first glance and there are some interesting moments here and there but there is room for improvement to make it all work together more cohesively.

Your opinion…

On Name


Total

On Logo


Total

On Application


Total
See what else happened on Brand New each year since publication began in 2006

Comments


New Logo
Sample Application

Share ›

Spotted Around the web

New Logo for Front

New Logo for Front
 
Spotted Jul. 30, 2020

Pinned Recent, Big Stories


Curated YIELD TO MERGERS

Transdev

Transdev
 
Posted Jun. 6, 2013